Sally Gunning Book Club Picks
PBR Review: This is an engaging coming of age story set in the pre revolutionary war period, a time in our country’s history marked by turmoil and conflict. Sally Gunning weaves some great period detail as she sheds light on what life was l More


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Talking Points: The focus of this book revolves around a young women coming of age in the Colonial Period. Shes quite progressive for this era and contrasting the differences to todays progressive young woman will generate lots of conversation for book clubs. There are also interesting and insightful threads on long term happiness in a marriage,love and integrity.This would make a great selection for book clubs that enjoy historical fiction, discussing womens issues and prefer a quite deep read.
book reviews and book club recommendations
PBR Review: This is well-researched and informative historical fiction. It takes place in Cape Cod in the year 1761 and follows the travails of Lyddie Berry, who is recently widowed. As is typical in this time period, when her husband drowns More


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Talking Points: The main character of this story is very much alive and totally pulls the reader in with her forthright thoughts and actions. Since her husband's trade of Whaling caused him to be away for long stretches of time, why does his death suddenly mean Lyddie is not capable of running her house by herself? There are also plenty of discussion points concerning the outlandish ways of the Puritanical Church which plays a major role in this story. Aside from women's rights, issues of racial prejudice are also woven into this story. Recommend for book clubs that enjoy complex characters, layered storylines or historical fiction.
book reviews and book club recommendations
PBR Review: This is an excellent book for anyone who loves a good story about father-daughter relationships. Sally Cabot Gunning gives many heartwarming details about the intense and complex bond between Martha and her father, Thomas Jeffers More


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Talking Points: This book takes a look at the challenges of making a living in the South and being female in the late 1770s. The Jefferson family was conflicted on the concept of slavery. They disliked the idea but needed slaves to run their farms, so they tried to compensate by treating their slaves like workers. Martha was a strong, intelligent woman, but was limited by the customs of the time and her difficult marriage.
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