One Thousand White Women
by Jim Fergus
Discussion Questions:
1. One Thousand White Women was written by a man, but in a woman’s point of view. Did you find this convincing?

2. In 1875, rebellious or unorthodox women were sometimes considered “hysterical” or insane. Is this still true in some circumstances today?

3. Does May Dodd remind you of a modern-day woman?

4. What would be today’s equivalent of traveling west to an unknown part of the country with a group of strangers?

5. Did you feel the Native Americans were accurately portrayed in the novel?

6. If the “Brides for Indians” program were actually put into effect in 1875, do you feel it would have been effective?

7. What circumstances would prompt you to undergo a journey like the one May Dodd took?

8. Do you consider One Thousand White Women a tragic story? If so, why? If not, why not?

9. Of the supporting female characters, who did you find the most likeable?

10. Were any of May Dodd’s actions unsympathetic? Would you find it difficult to leave your children behind in order to escape a horrendous situation?

(Discussion Questions by Publisher)


Book Club Talking Points:
In many cases, the Indian culture has higher moral standards than the whites. The story also demonstrates the bravery of women agreeing to be brides and the power of friendship. The concept is imaginative and fascinating, and it would be interesting to discuss the reasons why the women agreed to be part of the program. How would such a program fare today? The book also explores attitudes towards women and the Indian’s culture.
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